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Ohio Governor John Kasich Proclamation

Ohio Governor Kasich Proclaims April 23-29 Addiction Treatment Week in Ohio

(Columbus, Ohio) April 24, 2018 – John Kasich, Governor of Ohio, signs a proclamation declaring April 23rd-29th, 2018 Addiction Treatment Week in Ohio. National Addiction Treatment Week, an initiative by the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM), raises awareness that addiction is a disease, evidence-based treatments are available, and recovery is possible.

The adverse effects of the opioid epidemic and addiction in Ohio are evident. In 2016, Ohio had the second highest drug overdose death rate (39.1*) in the nation, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).[1]  The Ohio Department of Health reported that “unintentional drug overdoses caused the deaths of 4,050 Ohio residents [in 2016], a 32.8 percent increase compared to 2015 when there were 3,050 overdose deaths.[2]” The latest available data shows an average of 3,288 alcohol-related deaths per year in the state.[3]

The significant treatment gap for addiction in the United States (US) is an important part of the epidemic. Nearly 20.5 million Americans suffer from a substance use disorder (SUD), yet only 1 in 10 people with SUD receive treatment.[4] In 2015, nearly 2.3 million Americans suffered from opioid use disorder, yet there was only enough treatment capacity to treat 1.4 million people[5], leaving a treatment gap of nearly 1 million people.

“We applaud Governor Kasich’s proclamation of Addiction Treatment Week and his continued efforts to combat an epidemic that is without precedent in Ohio.  Generating awareness that addiction is a disease, rather than a moral failure, is a crucial step to saving lives,” said Shawn Ryan, MD, FASAM, president of the Ohio Society of Addiction Medicine (OHSAM). “Given the high rate of drug overdose deaths in our state, we must all work together to increase patients’ access to evidence-based addiction treatments.  OHSAM is committed to helping physicians treat addiction and reduce the barriers to successful treatment and recovery.”

To learn more about National Addiction Treatment Week, how to get involved, and how to spread the word about the need for a larger addiction medicine workforce, visit www.TreatAddictionSaveLives.org.

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* The number of deaths per 100,000 population

[1] https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/sosmap/drug_poisoning_mortality/drug_poisoning.htm

[2] 2016 Ohio Drug Overdose Data: General Findings http://www.odh.ohio.gov/-/media/ODH/ASSETS/Files/health/injury-prevention/2016-Ohio-Drug-Overdose-Report-FINAL.pdf

[3] https://www.cdc.gov/pcd/issues/2014/13_0293.htm

[4] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Office of the Surgeon General, Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health. Washington, DC: HHS, November 2016. CH 4-2

[5] https://www.finance.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/101116%20Opioid%20Treatment%20Gap%20Report%20Final.pdf

Georgia Governor Nathan Deal Proclamation

 

Governor Deal Proclaims April 23-29 National Addiction Treatment Week in Georgia

(Atlanta, Georgia) April 24, 2018 – Nathan Deal, Governor of Georgia, signs a proclamation declaring April 23rd-29th, 2018 National Addiction Treatment Week in Georgia. National Addiction Treatment Week, an initiative by the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM), raises awareness that addiction is a disease, evidence-based treatments are available, and recovery is possible.

The adverse effects of the opioid epidemic and addiction in Georgia and throughout the United States (US) are evident. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), from 1999 to 2016, more than 630,000 people have died from a drug overdose. Around 66% of the more than 63,600 drug overdose deaths in 2016 involved an opioid. On average, 115 Americans die every day from an opioid overdose.[1] CDC reports that, in Georgia, there were estimated 1,394 drug overdose deaths in 2016, and the latest available data shows an average of 2,555 alcohol-related deaths per year. [2]

The significant treatment gap for addiction in the US is an important part of the epidemic. Nearly 20.5 million Americans suffer from a substance use disorder (SUD), yet only 1 in 10 people with SUD receive treatment.[3] In 2015, nearly 2.3 million Americans suffered from opioid use disorder, yet there was only enough treatment capacity to treat 1.4 million people[4], leaving a treatment gap of nearly 1 million people.

“Governor Deal’s support of National Addiction Treatment Week increases awareness that addiction is a disease, rather than a moral failure,” said Susan Blank, MD, FASAM, president of the Georgia Society of Addiction Medicine (GSAM). “GSAM remains dedicated to increasing Georgians’ access to quality care by working to reduce the stigma associated with the disease and expand a qualified workforce to treat addiction and save lives.”

 

To learn more about National Addiction Treatment Week, how to get involved, and how to spread the word about the need for a larger addiction medicine workforce, visit www.TreatAddictionSaveLives.org.

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[1] https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/sosmap/drug_poisoning_mortality/drug_poisoning.htm

[2] https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/sosmap/drug_poisoning_mortality/drug_poisoning.htm

[3] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Office of the Surgeon General, Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health. Washington, DC: HHS, November 2016. CH 4-2

[4] https://www.finance.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/101116%20Opioid%20Treatment%20Gap%20Report%20Final.pdf

Connecticut Governor Malloy Signs Proclamation

(Hartford, Connecticut) April 23, 2018 – Dannel Malloy, Governor of Connecticut, signs a proclamation declaring April 23rd-29th, 2018 National Addiction Treatment Week in Connecticut. National Addiction Treatment Week, an initiative by the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM), raises awareness that addiction is a disease, evidence-based treatments are available, and recovery is possible.

The adverse effects of the opioid epidemic and addiction in Connecticut and throughout the United States (US) are evident. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), from 1999 to 2016, more than 630,000 people have died from a drug overdose. Around 66% of the more than 63,600 drug overdose deaths in 2016 involved an opioid. On average, 115 Americans die every day from an opioid overdose.[1] The CDC reports that Connecticut ranked 11th in the nation with a drug overdose mortality rate of 27.4.[2]

The significant treatment gap for addiction in the US is an important part of the epidemic. Nearly 20.5 million Americans suffer from a substance use disorder (SUD), yet only 1 in 10 people with SUD receive treatment.[3] In 2015, nearly 2.3 million Americans suffered from opioid use disorder, yet there was only enough treatment capacity to treat 1.4 million people[4], leaving a treatment gap of nearly 1 million people.

“Last week, the National Safety Council recognized Connecticut as one of the top 12 states in improving efforts to protect its residents from opioid overdose. We are pleased with the ongoing focus Governor Malloy has had on this epidemic. His support of National Addiction Treatment Week, will further community awareness that addiction is a disease, rather than a moral failure,” said J. Craig Allen, MD, president of the Connecticut Society of Addiction Medicine (CT-SAM). “Reducing the stigma and discrimination associated with the disease and training more clinicians in addiction medicine is crucial to saving lives. CT-SAM remains dedicated to helping physicians treat addiction and ensuring that patients in Connecticut have access to the quality care they need.”

To learn more about National Addiction Treatment Week, how to get involved, and how to spread the word about the need for a larger addiction medicine workforce, visit www.TreatAddictionSaveLives.org.

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About ASAM

The American Society of Addiction Medicine, founded in 1954, is a professional society representing over 5,000 physicians, clinicians, and associated professionals in the field of addiction medicine. ASAM is dedicated to increasing access and improving the quality of addiction treatment, educating physicians and the public, supporting research and prevention, and promoting the appropriate role of physicians in the care of patients with addiction. For more information visit www.ASAM.org.

 

About CT-SAM

The Connecticut Society of Addiction Medicine is the state chapter of the American Society of Addiction Medicine representing physicians, clinicians, and other associated addiction medicine professionals throughout the state of Connecticut.

 

[1] https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/sosmap/drug_poisoning_mortality/drug_poisoning.htm
[2] ibid
[3] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Office of the Surgeon General, Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health. Washington, DC: HHS, November 2016. CH 4-2
[4] https://www.finance.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/101116%20Opioid%20Treatment%20Gap%20Report%20Final.pdf

Kentucky Governor Bevin Proclamation

(Frankfort, Kentucky) April 23, 2018 – Matt Bevin, Governor of Kentucky, signs a proclamation declaring April 23rd-29th, 2018 National Addiction Treatment Week in Kentucky. National Addiction Treatment Week, an initiative by the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM), raises awareness that addiction is a disease, evidence-based treatments are available, and recovery is possible.

 

The adverse effects of substance use disorder (SUD) in Kentucky are particularly evident. It is one of states hardest hit by the opioid epidemic, ranked fifth in the nation in drug overdose death rate by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). There were estimated 1,419 drug overdose deaths in 2016, and the latest available data shows an average of 1,351 alcohol-related deaths per year in Kentucky, according to CDC studies.[1]

 

The significant treatment gap for addiction in the US is an important part of the epidemic. Nearly 20.5 million Americans[2] suffer from a substance use disorder (SUD), yet only 1 in 10 people[3] with SUD receive treatment. In 2015, nearly 2.3 million Americans suffered from opioid use disorder, yet there was only enough treatment capacity to treat 1.4 million people, leaving a treatment gap of nearly 1 million people.[4]

 

“We are thrilled and encouraged to be able to work alongside Governor Bevin and the legislature in providing affordable and accessible care,” said Mark Jorrisch, MD, DFASAM, President, Kentucky Society of Addiction Medicine. “Especially in a rural state like Kentucky, increasing patient access to quality care by qualifying more physicians in the addiction medicine subspecialty is critical to saving patients’ lives.”

 

To learn more about National Addiction Treatment Week, how to get involved, and to spread the word about the need for a larger addiction medicine workforce, visit www.TreatAddictionSaveLives.org.

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About ASAM

The American Society of Addiction Medicine, founded in 1954, is a professional society representing over 5,000 physicians, clinicians, and associated professionals in the field of addiction medicine. ASAM is dedicated to increasing access and improving the quality of addiction treatment, educating physicians and the public, supporting research and prevention, and promoting the appropriate role of physicians in the care of patients with addiction. For more information visit www.ASAM.org.

 

About the Kentucky Society of Addiction Medicine

The Kentucky Society of Addiction Medicine is the state chapter of the American Society of Addiction Medicine representing over 150 physicians, clinicians, and other associated addiction medicine professionals throughout the state of Kentucky.

 

[1] https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/sosmap/drug_poisoning_mortality/drug_poisoning.htm

[2] Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality. (2016). Key substance use and mental health indicators in the United States: Results from the 2015 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (HHS Publication No. SMA 16-4984, NSDUH Series H-51). Retrieved from http://www.samhsa.gov/data/.

[3] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Office of the Surgeon General, Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health. Washington, DC: HHS, November 2016. CH 4-2

[4] https://www.finance.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/101116%20Opioid%20Treatment%20Gap%20Report%20Final.pdf

North Carolina Governor Cooper Proclamation

(Raleigh, North Carolina) April 23, 2018 – Roy Cooper, Governor of North Carolina, signs a proclamation declaring April 23rd-29th, 2018 National Addiction Treatment Week in North Carolina. National Addiction Treatment Week, an initiative by the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM), raises awareness that addiction is a disease, evidence-based treatments are available, and recovery is possible.

 

The adverse effects of the opioid epidemic and addiction in North Carolina are evident. According to Governor Cooper’s Office, “Opioid overdose has claimed more than 12,000 lives in North Carolina since 1999, with opioid-related overdoses deaths up more than 800 percent in the state through 2016.”[1] The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), report that, in North Carolina, there were estimated 1,956 drug overdose deaths in 2016, and the latest available data shows an average of 2,761 alcohol related deaths per year. [2]

 

The significant treatment gap for addiction in the United States (US) is an important part of the epidemic. Nearly 20.5 million Americans suffer from a substance use disorder (SUD), yet only 1 in 10 people with SUD receive treatment.[3] In 2015, nearly 2.3 million Americans suffered from opioid use disorder, yet there was only enough treatment capacity to treat 1.4 million people[4], leaving a treatment gap of nearly 1 million people.

 

“We applaud Governor Cooper’s signing of the proclamation.  Generating awareness that addiction is a disease and more clinicians need to be trained in addiction medicine is critical to saving patient lives,” said Paul Martin, MD, DFASAM, president of the North Carolina Society of Addiction Medicine (NCSAM). “National Addiction Treatment Week reinforces NCSAM’s dedication to reducing the stigma associated with the disease, helping physicians treat addiction, and ensuring that patients in North Carolina have access to the quality care they need.”

 

To learn more about National Addiction Treatment Week, how to get involved, and how you can spread the word about the need for a larger addiction medicine workforce, visit www.TreatAddictionSaveLives.org.

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About ASAM

The American Society of Addiction Medicine, founded in 1954, is a professional society representing over 5,000 physicians, clinicians, and associated professionals in the field of addiction medicine. ASAM is dedicated to increasing access and improving the quality of addiction treatment, educating physicians and the public,

[1] https://governor.nc.gov/news/governor-cooper-announces-bold-action-plan-turn-tide-opioid-epidemic-north-carolina

[2] https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/sosmap/drug_poisoning_mortality/drug_poisoning.htm

[3] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Office of the Surgeon General, Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health. Washington, DC: HHS, November 2016. CH 4-2

[4] https://www.finance.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/101116%20Opioid%20Treatment%20Gap%20Report%20Final.pdf

North Dakota Governor Burgum Proclaims April 23-29 National Addiction Treatment Week

 

(Bismarck, North Dakota) April 23, 2018 – Doug Burgum, Governor of North Dakota, signs proclamation declaring April 23rd-29th, 2018 National Addiction Treatment Week in North Dakota. National Addiction Treatment Week, an initiative by the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM), raises awareness that addiction is a disease, evidence-based treatments are available, and recovery is possible.

The adverse effects of the opioid epidemic and addiction in North Dakota and throughout the United States (US) are evident. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), from 1999 to 2016, more than 630,000 people have died from a drug overdose. Around 66% of the more than 63,600 drug overdose deaths in 2016 involved an opioid. On average, 115 Americans die every day from an opioid overdose.[1]

The significant treatment gap for addiction in the United States (US) is an important part of the epidemic. Nearly 20.5 million Americans suffer from a substance use disorder (SUD), yet only 1 in 10 people with SUD receive treatment.[2] In 2015, nearly 2.3 million Americans suffered from opioid use disorder, yet there was only enough treatment capacity to treat 1.4 million people[3], leaving a treatment gap of nearly 1 million people.

“In order to save lives and increase patient access to quality care, we need to raise awareness that addiction is a disease, rather than a moral failure. Decreasing the stigma of the disease is essential to overcoming the opioid epidemic,” said Miriam Komaromy, MD, FACP, DFASAM, ASAM Regional Director, Region VIII. “Governor Burgum’s support of National Addiction Treatment Week reinforces ASAM’s dedication to expanding the addiction medicine workforce and ensuring that patients receive the quality care they need.”

National Addiction Treatment Week promotes that addiction is a disease, recovery is possible, and more clinicians need to enter the field of addiction medicine. Learn more on how to get involved and spread the word about the need for a larger addiction medicine workforce at www.TreatAddictionSaveLives.org.

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About ASAM

The American Society of Addiction Medicine, founded in 1954, is a professional society representing over 5,000 physicians, clinicians, and associated professionals in the field of addiction medicine. ASAM is dedicated to increasing access and improving the quality of addiction treatment, educating physicians and the public, supporting research and prevention, and promoting the appropriate role of physicians in the care of patients with addiction. For more information visit www.ASAM.org.

[1] https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/sosmap/drug_poisoning_mortality/drug_poisoning.htm

[2] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Office of the Surgeon General, Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health. Washington, DC: HHS, November 2016. CH 4-2

[3] https://www.finance.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/101116%20Opioid%20Treatment%20Gap%20Report%20Final.pdf

Pennsylvania Governor Wolf Proclaims April 23-29 National Addiction Treatment Week

(Harrisburg, Pennsylvania) April 23, 2018 – Tom Wolf, Governor of Pennsylvania, signs a proclamation declaring April 23rd-29th, 2018 National Addiction Treatment Week throughout Pennsylvania. National Addiction Treatment Week, an initiative by the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM), raises awareness that addiction is a disease, evidence-based treatments are available, and recovery is possible.

 

The adverse effects of the opioid epidemic and addiction in Pennsylvania are evident. As cited in the Governor’s Office Proclamation of Disaster Emergency on January 10th, the “total number of fatal drug overdoses in Pennsylvania in 2016 was 4,642, a 37% increase from 2015 and those deaths increasingly are the result of fentanyl and other synthetic opioid compounds; and…Pennsylvania’s rate of drug overdose is 36.5 per 100,000 which is significantly higher than the national average of 16.3 per 100,000.”[1]  Most recently, on April 4, 2018, Governor Wolf announced the renewal of the 90-day opioid disaster declaration.

 

The significant treatment gap for addiction in the United States (US) is an important part of the epidemic. Nearly 20.5 million Americans suffer from a substance use disorder (SUD), yet only 1 in 10 people with SUD receive treatment.[2] In 2015, nearly 2.3 million Americans suffered from opioid use disorder, yet there was only enough treatment capacity to treat 1.4 million people[3], leaving a treatment gap of nearly 1 million people.

 

“Governor Wolf’s proclamation represents another important step in helping to save lives in Pennsylvania,” said Frederic Baurer, MD, co-president of Pennsylvania Society of Addiction Medicine (PSAM). “National Addiction Treatment Week reinforces PSAM’s dedication to reducing the stigma associated with the disease, helping physicians treat addiction, and ensuring that Pennsylvanians have access to the quality care they need.”

 

To learn more about National Addiction Treatment Week, how to get involved, and how to spread the word about the need for a larger addiction medicine workforce, visit www.TreatAddictionSaveLives.org.

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About ASAM

The American Society of Addiction Medicine, founded in 1954, is a professional society representing over 5,000 physicians, clinicians, and associated professionals in the field of addiction medicine. ASAM is dedicated to increasing access and improving the quality of addiction treatment, educating physicians and the public, supporting research and prevention, and promoting the appropriate role of physicians in the care of patients with addiction. For more information visit www.ASAM.org.

 

About PSAM

The Pennsylvania Society of Addiction Medicine is the state chapter of the American Society of Addiction Medicine representing over 250 physicians, clinicians, and other associated addiction medicine professionals throughout the state of Pennsylvania.

[1] https://www.governor.pa.gov/governor-wolf-declares-heroin-and-opioid-epidemic-a-statewide-disaster-emergency/

[2] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Office of the Surgeon General, Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health. Washington, DC: HHS, November 2016. CH 4-2

[3] https://www.finance.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/101116%20Opioid%20Treatment%20Gap%20Report%20Final.pdf

Washington Governor Inslee Proclaims April 23-29 National Addiction Treatment Week

(Olympia, Washington) April 20, 2018 – Jay Inslee, Governor of Washington, signs a proclamation declaring April 23rd-29th, 2018 National Addiction Treatment Week in Washington. National Addiction Treatment Week, an initiative by the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM), raises awareness that addiction is a disease, evidence-based treatments are available, and recovery is possible.

 

The adverse effects of the opioid epidemic and addiction in Washington are evident. According to the Governor’s Office, “the opioid epidemic kills two people a day on average in the state.” The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), report that, in Washington, there were estimated 1,102 drug overdose deaths in 2016, and the latest available data shows an average of 1,981 alcohol related deaths per year.[1]

 

The significant treatment gap for addiction in the United States (US) is an important part of the epidemic. Nearly 20.5 million Americans suffer from a substance use disorder (SUD), yet only 1 in 10 people with SUD receive treatment.[2] In 2015, nearly 2.3 million Americans suffered from opioid use disorder, yet there was only enough treatment capacity to treat 1.4 million people[3], leaving a treatment gap of nearly 1 million people.

 

“In order to save lives and increase patient access to quality care in Washington, we need to raise awareness that addiction is a disease, rather than a moral failure,” said Mark Murphy, MD, president of the Washington Society of Addiction Medicine (WSAM). “Governor Inslee’s support of National Addiction Treatment Week reinforces WSAM’s dedication to reducing the stigma associated with the disease, helping physicians treat addiction, and ensuring that Washingtonians have access to the quality care they need.”

 

To learn more about National Addiction Treatment Week, how to get involved, and how to spread the word about the need for a larger addiction medicine workforce, visit www.TreatAddictionSaveLives.org.

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About ASAM

The American Society of Addiction Medicine, founded in 1954, is a professional society representing over 5,000 physicians, clinicians, and associated professionals in the field of addiction medicine. ASAM is dedicated to increasing access and improving the quality of addiction treatment, educating physicians and the public, supporting research and prevention, and promoting the appropriate role of physicians in the care of patients with addiction. For more information visit www.ASAM.org.

 

About Washington Society of Addiction Medicine

The Washington Society of Addiction Medicine is the state chapter of the American Society of Addiction Medicine representing over 115 physicians, clinicians, and other associated addiction medicine professionals throughout the state of Washington.

[1] https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/sosmap/drug_poisoning_mortality/drug_poisoning.htm

[2] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Office of the Surgeon General, Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health. Washington, DC: HHS, November 2016. CH 4-2

[3] https://www.finance.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/101116%20Opioid%20Treatment%20Gap%20Report%20Final.pdf

Arizona Governor Ducey Proclaims April 23-29 Addiction Treatment Week

(Phoenix, Arizona) April 23, 2018 – The Honorable Doug Ducey, Governor of Arizona, signs proclamation declaring April 23rd -29th, 2018 Addiction Treatment Week in Arizona. National Addiction Treatment Week, an initiative by the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM), raises awareness that addiction is a disease, evidence-based treatments are available, and recovery is possible.

Statistics show the adverse effects of addiction in Arizona. As highlighted by the Governor’s Office in the Arizona Opioid Epidemic Act Primer, there were more than 800 opioid-related deaths in Arizona between June 2017, when the Governor declared the opioid crisis a state-wide emergency, and January 2018. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in 2016, there were estimated 1,382 drug overdose deaths and an average of 2,362 alcohol-related deaths per year Arizona.[1]

The significant treatment gap for addiction in the United States (US) is an important part of the epidemic. Nearly 20.5 million Americans[2] suffer from a substance use disorder (SUD), yet only 1 in 10 people[3] with SUD receive treatment. In 2015, nearly 2.3 million Americans suffered from opioid addiction, yet there was only enough treatment capacity to treat 1.4 million people, leaving a treatment gap of nearly 1 million people.[4]

 

“We are excited Governor Ducey has taken yet another initiative to promote healthy families and communities throughout the state of Arizona,” said Monica Faira, MD, President, Arizona Society of Addiction Medicine (AzSAM). “Our Chapter, in line with national ASAM, will continue to be of service in helping educate clinicians and the public on the chronicity of addiction and the availability of evidence-based treatment. We also aim to help Arizona increase the number of both competent and confident clinicians equipped to help combat this opioid epidemic.”

 

To learn more about National Addiction Treatment Week, how to get involved, and spread the word about the need for a larger addiction medicine workforce, visit www.TreatAddictionSaveLives.org.

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[1] https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/sosmap/drug_poisoning_mortality/drug_poisoning.htm

[2] Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality. (2016). Key substance use and mental health indicators in the United States: Results from the 2015 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (HHS Publication No. SMA 16-4984, NSDUH Series H-51). Retrieved from http://www.samhsa.gov/data/.

[3] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Office of the Surgeon General, Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health. Washington, DC: HHS, November 2016. CH 4-2

[4] https://www.finance.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/101116%20Opioid%20Treatment%20Gap%20Report%20Final.pdf

Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker Signs Proclamation

(Madison, Wisconsin) March 23, 2018 – Scott Walker, Governor of Wisconsin, signs proclamation declaring April 23-29, 2018 “Addiction Treatment Awareness Week” throughout the State of Wisconsin. National Addiction Treatment Week, an initiative by the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM), raises awareness that addiction is a disease, evidence-based treatments are available, and recovery is possible.

Nearly 20.5 million Americans suffer from a substance use disorder (SUD), yet only 1 in 10 people with SUD receive treatment.[1] An estimated 1.8 million Americans have opioid use disorder (OUD) related to prescription opioids [2]; 626,000 have heroin-related OUD [3] with an estimated cost of over $504 billion [4]. Every year in the State of Wisconsin, an average of at least 1,706 people die from an alcohol-related issue. In 2016, an estimated 1,074 people died from a drug overdose in Wisconsin [5], according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

“Generating awareness that addiction is a disease and more clinicians need to be trained in addiction medicine is critical to saving patients’ lives.” said Matthew Felgus, MD, FASAM, President, Wisconsin Society of Addiction Medicine. “We are thrilled that Governor Walker has taken this important step to help increase awareness in Wisconsin.”

National Addiction Treatment Week promotes that addiction is a disease, recovery is possible, and more clinicians need to enter the field of addiction medicine.

Learn more on how to get involved and spread the word about the need for a larger addiction medicine workforce at www.TreatAddictionSaveLives.org.

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Contact: Christine Merrifield
301.547.4140, cmerrifield@ASAM.org

 

SOURCES:

1 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Office of the Surgeon General, Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health. Washington, DC: HHS, November 2016. CH 4-2
2 Council of Economic Advisers. (2017, November). The underestimated cost of the opioid crisis. Washington, DC: Executive Office of the President of the United States.
3 ibid
4 Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality. (2017). Key substance use and mental health indicators in the United States: Results from the 2016 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Rockville, MD: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
5 https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/sosmap/drug_poisoning_mortality/drug_poisoning.htm