News

Webinar: Addiction Medicine | The Next Generation

This webinar will cover what an addiction medicine specialist looks like, the different settings an addiction medicine clinician can work in, and the future pathways physician will have to become board-certified in Addiction Medicine. This webinar is ideal for pre-medical student, medical students, residents, and medical school administrators.

Speakers:
Louis E. Baxter, MD Former President of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM)
Anna Lembke, MD Associate Professor – Med Center Line, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University
Helen Jack, Fourth-year student at Harvard Medical School and member of the Student Coalition on Addiction

Webinar: Pathways to the Addiction Medicine Subspecialty

The webinar will begin with an overview of the current state of the addiction epidemic and the huge gap in addiction treatment. It will then move on to the role physicians can play to help close this gap, and the importance to sit for the ABPM Addiction Medicine exam. The webinar will then move on to a representative from ABPM discussing the details of how physicians can apply for the ADM exam and any “lessons learned” from last year. This webinar is ideal for any physician interested in addiction medicine, ABAM Diplomates, DATA 2000 waivered physicians, medical directors, and others.

Speakers/Presenters:

  • Shawn Ryan, MD, MBA  President of OHSAM (Ohio state chapter of ASAM)
  • Michael Weaver, MD, FASAM  Professor at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth)
  • Steve Daviss, MD  Senior Medical Advisor, Office of the CMO at SAMHSA

Ohio Governor John Kasich Proclamation

Ohio Governor Kasich Proclaims April 23-29 Addiction Treatment Week in Ohio

(Columbus, Ohio) April 24, 2018 – John Kasich, Governor of Ohio, signs a proclamation declaring April 23rd-29th, 2018 Addiction Treatment Week in Ohio. National Addiction Treatment Week, an initiative by the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM), raises awareness that addiction is a disease, evidence-based treatments are available, and recovery is possible.

The adverse effects of the opioid epidemic and addiction in Ohio are evident. In 2016, Ohio had the second highest drug overdose death rate (39.1*) in the nation, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).[1]  The Ohio Department of Health reported that “unintentional drug overdoses caused the deaths of 4,050 Ohio residents [in 2016], a 32.8 percent increase compared to 2015 when there were 3,050 overdose deaths.[2]” The latest available data shows an average of 3,288 alcohol-related deaths per year in the state.[3]

The significant treatment gap for addiction in the United States (US) is an important part of the epidemic. Nearly 20.5 million Americans suffer from a substance use disorder (SUD), yet only 1 in 10 people with SUD receive treatment.[4] In 2015, nearly 2.3 million Americans suffered from opioid use disorder, yet there was only enough treatment capacity to treat 1.4 million people[5], leaving a treatment gap of nearly 1 million people.

“We applaud Governor Kasich’s proclamation of Addiction Treatment Week and his continued efforts to combat an epidemic that is without precedent in Ohio.  Generating awareness that addiction is a disease, rather than a moral failure, is a crucial step to saving lives,” said Shawn Ryan, MD, FASAM, president of the Ohio Society of Addiction Medicine (OHSAM). “Given the high rate of drug overdose deaths in our state, we must all work together to increase patients’ access to evidence-based addiction treatments.  OHSAM is committed to helping physicians treat addiction and reduce the barriers to successful treatment and recovery.”

To learn more about National Addiction Treatment Week, how to get involved, and how to spread the word about the need for a larger addiction medicine workforce, visit www.TreatAddictionSaveLives.org.

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* The number of deaths per 100,000 population

[1] https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/sosmap/drug_poisoning_mortality/drug_poisoning.htm

[2] 2016 Ohio Drug Overdose Data: General Findings http://www.odh.ohio.gov/-/media/ODH/ASSETS/Files/health/injury-prevention/2016-Ohio-Drug-Overdose-Report-FINAL.pdf

[3] https://www.cdc.gov/pcd/issues/2014/13_0293.htm

[4] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Office of the Surgeon General, Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health. Washington, DC: HHS, November 2016. CH 4-2

[5] https://www.finance.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/101116%20Opioid%20Treatment%20Gap%20Report%20Final.pdf

Georgia Governor Nathan Deal Proclamation

 

Governor Deal Proclaims April 23-29 National Addiction Treatment Week in Georgia

(Atlanta, Georgia) April 24, 2018 – Nathan Deal, Governor of Georgia, signs a proclamation declaring April 23rd-29th, 2018 National Addiction Treatment Week in Georgia. National Addiction Treatment Week, an initiative by the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM), raises awareness that addiction is a disease, evidence-based treatments are available, and recovery is possible.

The adverse effects of the opioid epidemic and addiction in Georgia and throughout the United States (US) are evident. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), from 1999 to 2016, more than 630,000 people have died from a drug overdose. Around 66% of the more than 63,600 drug overdose deaths in 2016 involved an opioid. On average, 115 Americans die every day from an opioid overdose.[1] CDC reports that, in Georgia, there were estimated 1,394 drug overdose deaths in 2016, and the latest available data shows an average of 2,555 alcohol-related deaths per year. [2]

The significant treatment gap for addiction in the US is an important part of the epidemic. Nearly 20.5 million Americans suffer from a substance use disorder (SUD), yet only 1 in 10 people with SUD receive treatment.[3] In 2015, nearly 2.3 million Americans suffered from opioid use disorder, yet there was only enough treatment capacity to treat 1.4 million people[4], leaving a treatment gap of nearly 1 million people.

“Governor Deal’s support of National Addiction Treatment Week increases awareness that addiction is a disease, rather than a moral failure,” said Susan Blank, MD, FASAM, president of the Georgia Society of Addiction Medicine (GSAM). “GSAM remains dedicated to increasing Georgians’ access to quality care by working to reduce the stigma associated with the disease and expand a qualified workforce to treat addiction and save lives.”

 

To learn more about National Addiction Treatment Week, how to get involved, and how to spread the word about the need for a larger addiction medicine workforce, visit www.TreatAddictionSaveLives.org.

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[1] https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/sosmap/drug_poisoning_mortality/drug_poisoning.htm

[2] https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/sosmap/drug_poisoning_mortality/drug_poisoning.htm

[3] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Office of the Surgeon General, Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health. Washington, DC: HHS, November 2016. CH 4-2

[4] https://www.finance.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/101116%20Opioid%20Treatment%20Gap%20Report%20Final.pdf

Webinar: Improving the Language & Coverage of Addiction

Reflecting new scientific understanding of addiction, this webinar will offer guidance on how the media can accurately and fairly cover addiction through language, point-of-view, and style. The medical understanding of addiction and the science behind the disease has changed significantly. While the medical community changes the way it treats addiction, the media is also changing the way it covers addiction. The webinar will consider the stigma surrounding addiction and how the way the media covers the disease effects the public perception of the disease. Importantly, the webinar also will discuss the recent changes made to the AP Stylebook about the word “addict” and other stigmatizing words.

Speakers:

  • Michael Botticelli, Former Director of the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy
  • Sarah E. Wakeman, MD, FASAM, Medical Director of the Massachusetts General Hospital Substance Use Disorder Initiative
  • Jeff McMillan, Eastern US Enterprise Editor for The Associated Press and AP Stylebook Committee Member

Watch the recorded webinar:

Social Media Thunderclap

Get Involved: Spread the message on social media!

Thunderclap is a tool that lets our message be heard when you, your friends and your organization say it together. Think of it as an “online flash mob.” Join our Thunderclap, and you and others will share the weeks “Treat Addiction. Save Lives.” message at the same time, spreading it through the largest social media channels.

Sign-up for this Thunderclap!

Connecticut Governor Malloy Signs Proclamation

(Hartford, Connecticut) April 23, 2018 – Dannel Malloy, Governor of Connecticut, signs a proclamation declaring April 23rd-29th, 2018 National Addiction Treatment Week in Connecticut. National Addiction Treatment Week, an initiative by the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM), raises awareness that addiction is a disease, evidence-based treatments are available, and recovery is possible.

The adverse effects of the opioid epidemic and addiction in Connecticut and throughout the United States (US) are evident. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), from 1999 to 2016, more than 630,000 people have died from a drug overdose. Around 66% of the more than 63,600 drug overdose deaths in 2016 involved an opioid. On average, 115 Americans die every day from an opioid overdose.[1] The CDC reports that Connecticut ranked 11th in the nation with a drug overdose mortality rate of 27.4.[2]

The significant treatment gap for addiction in the US is an important part of the epidemic. Nearly 20.5 million Americans suffer from a substance use disorder (SUD), yet only 1 in 10 people with SUD receive treatment.[3] In 2015, nearly 2.3 million Americans suffered from opioid use disorder, yet there was only enough treatment capacity to treat 1.4 million people[4], leaving a treatment gap of nearly 1 million people.

“Last week, the National Safety Council recognized Connecticut as one of the top 12 states in improving efforts to protect its residents from opioid overdose. We are pleased with the ongoing focus Governor Malloy has had on this epidemic. His support of National Addiction Treatment Week, will further community awareness that addiction is a disease, rather than a moral failure,” said J. Craig Allen, MD, president of the Connecticut Society of Addiction Medicine (CT-SAM). “Reducing the stigma and discrimination associated with the disease and training more clinicians in addiction medicine is crucial to saving lives. CT-SAM remains dedicated to helping physicians treat addiction and ensuring that patients in Connecticut have access to the quality care they need.”

To learn more about National Addiction Treatment Week, how to get involved, and how to spread the word about the need for a larger addiction medicine workforce, visit www.TreatAddictionSaveLives.org.

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About ASAM

The American Society of Addiction Medicine, founded in 1954, is a professional society representing over 5,000 physicians, clinicians, and associated professionals in the field of addiction medicine. ASAM is dedicated to increasing access and improving the quality of addiction treatment, educating physicians and the public, supporting research and prevention, and promoting the appropriate role of physicians in the care of patients with addiction. For more information visit www.ASAM.org.

 

About CT-SAM

The Connecticut Society of Addiction Medicine is the state chapter of the American Society of Addiction Medicine representing physicians, clinicians, and other associated addiction medicine professionals throughout the state of Connecticut.

 

[1] https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/sosmap/drug_poisoning_mortality/drug_poisoning.htm
[2] ibid
[3] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Office of the Surgeon General, Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health. Washington, DC: HHS, November 2016. CH 4-2
[4] https://www.finance.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/101116%20Opioid%20Treatment%20Gap%20Report%20Final.pdf

Kentucky Governor Bevin Proclamation

(Frankfort, Kentucky) April 23, 2018 – Matt Bevin, Governor of Kentucky, signs a proclamation declaring April 23rd-29th, 2018 National Addiction Treatment Week in Kentucky. National Addiction Treatment Week, an initiative by the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM), raises awareness that addiction is a disease, evidence-based treatments are available, and recovery is possible.

 

The adverse effects of substance use disorder (SUD) in Kentucky are particularly evident. It is one of states hardest hit by the opioid epidemic, ranked fifth in the nation in drug overdose death rate by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). There were estimated 1,419 drug overdose deaths in 2016, and the latest available data shows an average of 1,351 alcohol-related deaths per year in Kentucky, according to CDC studies.[1]

 

The significant treatment gap for addiction in the US is an important part of the epidemic. Nearly 20.5 million Americans[2] suffer from a substance use disorder (SUD), yet only 1 in 10 people[3] with SUD receive treatment. In 2015, nearly 2.3 million Americans suffered from opioid use disorder, yet there was only enough treatment capacity to treat 1.4 million people, leaving a treatment gap of nearly 1 million people.[4]

 

“We are thrilled and encouraged to be able to work alongside Governor Bevin and the legislature in providing affordable and accessible care,” said Mark Jorrisch, MD, DFASAM, President, Kentucky Society of Addiction Medicine. “Especially in a rural state like Kentucky, increasing patient access to quality care by qualifying more physicians in the addiction medicine subspecialty is critical to saving patients’ lives.”

 

To learn more about National Addiction Treatment Week, how to get involved, and to spread the word about the need for a larger addiction medicine workforce, visit www.TreatAddictionSaveLives.org.

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About ASAM

The American Society of Addiction Medicine, founded in 1954, is a professional society representing over 5,000 physicians, clinicians, and associated professionals in the field of addiction medicine. ASAM is dedicated to increasing access and improving the quality of addiction treatment, educating physicians and the public, supporting research and prevention, and promoting the appropriate role of physicians in the care of patients with addiction. For more information visit www.ASAM.org.

 

About the Kentucky Society of Addiction Medicine

The Kentucky Society of Addiction Medicine is the state chapter of the American Society of Addiction Medicine representing over 150 physicians, clinicians, and other associated addiction medicine professionals throughout the state of Kentucky.

 

[1] https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/sosmap/drug_poisoning_mortality/drug_poisoning.htm

[2] Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality. (2016). Key substance use and mental health indicators in the United States: Results from the 2015 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (HHS Publication No. SMA 16-4984, NSDUH Series H-51). Retrieved from http://www.samhsa.gov/data/.

[3] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Office of the Surgeon General, Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health. Washington, DC: HHS, November 2016. CH 4-2

[4] https://www.finance.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/101116%20Opioid%20Treatment%20Gap%20Report%20Final.pdf

North Carolina Governor Cooper Proclamation

(Raleigh, North Carolina) April 23, 2018 – Roy Cooper, Governor of North Carolina, signs a proclamation declaring April 23rd-29th, 2018 National Addiction Treatment Week in North Carolina. National Addiction Treatment Week, an initiative by the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM), raises awareness that addiction is a disease, evidence-based treatments are available, and recovery is possible.

 

The adverse effects of the opioid epidemic and addiction in North Carolina are evident. According to Governor Cooper’s Office, “Opioid overdose has claimed more than 12,000 lives in North Carolina since 1999, with opioid-related overdoses deaths up more than 800 percent in the state through 2016.”[1] The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), report that, in North Carolina, there were estimated 1,956 drug overdose deaths in 2016, and the latest available data shows an average of 2,761 alcohol related deaths per year. [2]

 

The significant treatment gap for addiction in the United States (US) is an important part of the epidemic. Nearly 20.5 million Americans suffer from a substance use disorder (SUD), yet only 1 in 10 people with SUD receive treatment.[3] In 2015, nearly 2.3 million Americans suffered from opioid use disorder, yet there was only enough treatment capacity to treat 1.4 million people[4], leaving a treatment gap of nearly 1 million people.

 

“We applaud Governor Cooper’s signing of the proclamation.  Generating awareness that addiction is a disease and more clinicians need to be trained in addiction medicine is critical to saving patient lives,” said Paul Martin, MD, DFASAM, president of the North Carolina Society of Addiction Medicine (NCSAM). “National Addiction Treatment Week reinforces NCSAM’s dedication to reducing the stigma associated with the disease, helping physicians treat addiction, and ensuring that patients in North Carolina have access to the quality care they need.”

 

To learn more about National Addiction Treatment Week, how to get involved, and how you can spread the word about the need for a larger addiction medicine workforce, visit www.TreatAddictionSaveLives.org.

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About ASAM

The American Society of Addiction Medicine, founded in 1954, is a professional society representing over 5,000 physicians, clinicians, and associated professionals in the field of addiction medicine. ASAM is dedicated to increasing access and improving the quality of addiction treatment, educating physicians and the public,

[1] https://governor.nc.gov/news/governor-cooper-announces-bold-action-plan-turn-tide-opioid-epidemic-north-carolina

[2] https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/sosmap/drug_poisoning_mortality/drug_poisoning.htm

[3] U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Office of the Surgeon General, Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health. Washington, DC: HHS, November 2016. CH 4-2

[4] https://www.finance.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/101116%20Opioid%20Treatment%20Gap%20Report%20Final.pdf